Posts Tagged ‘Hurricane Isaac’

Secrets Exposed!! President Barack Obama Is Guilty!

I have some shocking news to share with you.  The conspiracy theories have been running rampant since last weekend and now I have proof that they may not have been so far-fetched!

Some of you will scream that it’s unfair that the Commander-in-Chief of the greatest nation on Earth should be granted so much power and control.  It’s one thing that President Barack Obama worked very hard to pass the Patient Protection and Affordable Act, or “Obamacare” in March 2010 and repealed “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” in September 2011.  But, the powers that he possesses go much deeper than that.

Last week, right-wing blowhard Rush Limbaugh angered me slightly, but then I just laughed at his stupidity when he stated that President Obama was indirectly responsible for Tropical Storm Isaac cancelling the first day of the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Florida.  Limbaugh stated, “I’m not alleging conspiracies here. The Hurricane Center is the regime; the Hurricane Center is the Commerce Department.  It’s the government. It’s Obama.”

At first, I thought, that man is so stupid and he’ll say anything to get people riled up.

As you recall, last week, the initial storm track of  “Isaac” from the Hurricane Center had the storm passing dangerously close to south Florida before the track moved more west-northwest taking it into the Gulf of Mexico instead of across Florida.  However, we all know that weather forecasts never change and that meteorologists are never wrong!  Right?

Sadly, I admit that Limbaugh was on to something.  It seems that once the Republicans cancelled the first day of their convention, Isaac’s course shifted and set its sights on Louisiana and that is where it made landfall.

And, now here’s the smoking gun that proves that the “conspiracy theorists” were right.  I have proof that President Obama is manipulating the atmosphere in his quest to defeat Mitt Romney in the November presidential election and this could be an inconvenient truth to some.

While all eyes were focused on the Gulf of Mexico last week to see where Hurricane Isaac would make landfall and to see how much flooding would take place in Louisiana, two other storms were developing out in the Atlantic just in time to wreak havoc on the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina, September 4-6, 2012.

On August 30, 2012, Tropical Storm Kirk strengthened into a hurricane and the next day, winds reached 105 miles-per-hour, which is a category two hurricane.  However, it dissipated Sunday, September 2nd and never posed a threat to land, much less the East Coast.

And, now Tropical Storm Leslie is located out in the Atlantic and will likely become a hurricane later this week, but it will not threaten the East Coast of the United States anytime soon.

That means two hurricanes moving through the Atlantic in the week before and the week of the Democratic National Convention both steered clear of North Carolina.  Rather convenient, wouldn’t you say?

So, Mr. President, since you now control the weather, once you’re finished with the convention, could you please send enough rain to Illinois and Iowa to alleviate the drought?  Thank you in advance.

The preceding blog is satire.

sat·ire

noun

1.

the use of irony, sarcasm, ridicule, or the like, in exposing, denouncing, or deriding vice, folly, etc.
2.

a literary composition, in verse or prose, in which human folly and vice are held up to scorn, derision, or ridicule.
My name is Anthony Peoples and I approve this satirical blog.

Tropical Systems Can Drench The Quad Cities Like Isaac This Weekend

The remnants from Hurricane Issac that made landfall Tuesday night and Wednesday morning in Louisiana will be bringing significant rains and possible flooding to southeastern Iowa, the Quad Cities and west-central Illinois this weekend.

The tropical nature of the air associated with this storm pushed dew points into the 70s in the Quad Cities Friday afternoon.

Rain will spread south to north Friday night into Saturday morning across the area and heavy rain is forecast Saturday and Saturday night from southeastern Iowa to the Quad Cities east into Geneseo and Princeton, Illinois.  Look at this forecast of rainfall potential.

As you can tell, from around Burlington, Iowa, to Galesburg, Geneseo, and Kewanee, Illinois, anywhere from 5-7″ of rain could fall.  There could be isolated higher totals.  In the Quad Cities, around 3″ is not out of the question.  However, notice how drastically the cut-off line is for rainfall northwest of the metro area.  Dubuque and Iowa City, Iowa, over to Galena, Illinois, may see little, if any, rain.

If this forecast verifies in the Quad Cities and we do pick up over 3″ of rain, it would be the first time in more than two years that a system brought that much rain.  On July 6-7, 2010, 3.45″ of rain fell at the airport in Moline, Illinois, the official weather observation site for the Quad Cities.

The last calendar day with more than two inches of rain in Moline was June 18, 2010.  2.23″ of rain fell that day.

When hurricanes hit the Gulf Coast and the East Coast, we hear about incredible rainfall totals of more than two feet.  Four years ago in September, we experienced the remnants of two storms.

Early in that month, the remnants of Hurricane Gustav, brought 2.44″ of rain at Quad City International Airport from September 2-4, 2008, with 2.23″ of that falling on September 4, 2008.

And, on the heels of that storm, the remnants of Hurricane Ike brought us even more rain.

From September 12-14, 2008, the Quad Cities picked up 7.08″ of rain.  Of that, 2.29″ fell on September 12th, 4.26″ on September 13th, and we picked up 0.53″ on September 14th.

When September 2008 ended, the official rainfall total for the Quad Cities was 10.91″, which was 7.75″ above average and one of the all-time wettest September months on record.

So, while the Quad Cities don’t see the hurricane-force winds with these systems, we do occasionally get the tropical moisture in the form of heavy rain and high humidity.

Have a great weekend.

Anthony

Two Friends in New Orleans Reflect on Hurricane Katrina’s Anniversary As Isaac Makes Landfall

Hurricane Isaac made its second landfall around 4 a.m. this morning near Port Fourchon, Louisiana with winds sustained at 80 mile-per-hour.  It first made landfall Tuesday evening near Plaquemine Parish, Louisiana, about 95 miles from New Orleans.

While there is flooding and damage, this tropical system pales in comparison to Hurricane Katrina that made landfall on this date back in 2005.  More than 1,800 people lost their lives and many more left New Orleans and never came back making their new home elsewhere in the United States.

I visited New Orleans in the spring of 2010 and even after almost five years, there was still much work to be done and many of the damaged and abandoned homes in the Ninth Ward remained standing.

A friend of mine from Murray State University, Crystal Craddock-Posey and her husband, Anthony, live in New Orleans.  At the bottom of this blog, check out some of Ants’ incredible photos of the aftermath of Katrina and how much still needed to be done more than a year later.

PREPARING FOR “ISAAC”

I talked with Crystal back in 2008 on the three-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina and I blogged about it then.  You can find that at the bottom of this blog, too.  However, I sent Crystal a few questions earlier this week as Isaac was still churning its way through the Gulf of Mexico as a tropical storm.

Q: What is the feeling now that a “state of emergency” has been issued and the storm could move closer to New Orleans?

The concensus in the city is that Isaac won’t be too bad. It’s not a strong system. The city (and its residents) are much better organized and prepared to deal with Isaac. Local area officials are working together and with the State in a much more efficient way than they did during Katrina. Even if Isaac turns out to be not so bad, it dredges up Katrina stress in differing degrees for people here.

Q: In the seven years since Katrina (and four since we did the previous blog), what changes have you noticed?

The city has improved by leaps and bounds, since the devastation of Katrina. There are so many new shops and restaurants post-Katrina. The city just “runs” better. There is still room for improvement, though.

Q: How is the “new” (current) NOLA different than the old NOLA?

So many people moved to New Orleans after Katrina, that it’s taken on a “newer” feel in some ways. E.g., new tech-centered businesses, younger entrepreneurs. The old-world charm is still very much present here, however.

Q: Since the Gulf has been relatively quiet for years, are you afraid that this could the season of big hurricanes?

One never knows, but I don’t think this will be a season for big hurricanes. We had a three-year lull between 2005’s Katrina and 2008’s Gustav. Now, four years later, we have Isaac approaching.

Here is the blog that I posted on August 28, 2008, on the three-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina and it also features some background information (current at the time):

New Orleans: Three years after Katrina

Friday, August 29th, 2008

HURRICANE GUSTAV MAKES LANDFALL:   Gustav made landfall early Monday morning, September 1st, near Cocodrie, Louisiana, which is about 70 miles southwest of New Orleans or 100 miles southeast of Lafayette, Louisiana.  Winds were at 110 miles-per-hour at landfall making Gustav a Category Two storm.  (Top winds peaked at 150 miles-per-hour Saturday.

UPDATE:  Saturday, August 30th, noon.  My friends, Crystal and Anthony, have decided to evacuate New Orleans in advance of Gustav.  (You’ll read Crystal’s interview below.)

ORIGINAL POST:  Friday, August 29, 2 p.m.

Friday, August 29th, marks the three-year anniversary when Hurricane Katrina hit Louisiana causing levees to breach and submerging 80 percent of New Orleans.

Now, residents are becoming uneasy and are closely watching the Caribbean Sea as Hurricane Gustav gains strength and threatens with a possible landfall early Tuesday morning somewhere near the Crescent City.

Once the storm makes it into the Gulf of Mexico this weekend, forecasters will be able to pinpoint more accurately and precisely the intensity and where Gustav will make landfall.

KATRINA HISTORY

Hurricane Katrina now stands as the sixth strongest Atlantic hurricane ever recorded (this is based on the central barometric pressure, not winds).  However, its peak winds hit 175 miles-per-hour.

Although Katrina’s winds had dropped to 125 miles-per-hour (still a very strong Category Three storm) when it made landfall near Buras, Louisiana, it was what happened after the storm began to move away from New Orleans that we will always remember.

The winds, rain, and the storm surge (estimated to be at least fourteen feet), caused 53 different levees to breach.

This allowed additional water pushed into Lake Pontchartrain from the Gulf during the hurricane to flood New Orleans.

For months, the rest of the nation and the world watched the horrific watery images from the city so rich in history and culture and wondered if it would ever return to its glory.

The death toll in the United States from Katrina is at least 1,836 (1,577 from Louisiana alone).  There are still 705 people considered missing from the storm.

Three years later, many people still consider the slow reaction time to the disaster from local, state, and federal levels of the government, a complete failure.

While it is still too early to tell where Gustav will make landfall, many people in New Orleans are getting ready– just in case.

NEW ORLEANS– THREE YEARS LATER  (From my 2008 blog on Katrina’s anniversary)

Thursday night, I emailed a friend and former classmate of mine, Crystal Craddock-Posey, who has lived in New Orleans since 1992 with her husband, Anthony, and I want to share her responses with you.

Q:  With a projected landfall still days away and a possible track that could include New Orleans, what is the mood at this point?

“People are on edge here.   Local stations have begun broadcasting at 4:30 a.m. and extended regular noon and evening broadcasts to an hour to cover the issue of the approaching storm.

Some folks in areas which did not flood are saying that they are going to stay for Gustav unless it gains more strength before landfall.  Some who were here for Katrina are staying again; most are not, and have begun leaving already.  

People in our area are already boarding up windows and filling up their tanks.  At this point, people don’t know whether to go buy a bunch of hurricane food and supplies, or just pack up and leave.  

It brings to mind something my grandmother used to say, ‘Nervous as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs!’   I think Saturday will be the point when most make the decision to stay or go.”
Q:  Are people taking this storm seriously there knowing it could quickly develop into a major hurricane in the Gulf?

“I think this storm is being taken seriously by most.    No one wants another Katrina.   My mailman received eight feet of water in his home after the levees failed following Katrina.   He is back in his repaired home now, and is seriously worried about a repeat performance.”

Q:  When Katrina submerged 80% of the city with water, how much damage did you encounter and where are you in relation to the ninth ward, one of the hardest hit areas?

“We were fortunate to have lived in the 20 % of New Orleans which did not flood.  We are higher up near the rim of the “bowl-shaped” city, so the water didn’t reach us.  We had water damage from above, though.  The high winds and tornadoes took off sections of roof and boards from our rear dormer, so we had water damage in the form of fallen ceilings, damaged floors, and mold everywhere, etc.   

We are a few miles from the ninth ward.  The ninth ward is behind the Central Business District, the French Quarter and Bywater areas of the city, going toward Chalmette/St. Bernard Parish, where the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet, aka “Mister Go” failed.”

Q:  Describe the feel of New Orleans now with the three-year anniversary Friday.  Progress is being made slowly, but what is the ”new” New Orleans like compared to the “old”.

“There were supposed to be certain ceremonies held to honor those who perished in Hurricane Katrina.    One local cemetery has planted small white flags, one for every person who died during Katrina, with a name on each flag.  (By the way, a client of mine lost her dad, her stepmother, her aunt and her 12-year-old brother; they drowned in their home.  She also lost everything she owned that she hadn’t taken with her during the evacuation.)   

That was supposed to last through Labor Day Weekend.    The anniversary is today, and it seems to be adding fuel to the fire of distress.   

“New” New Orleans in the French Quarter, Garden District and Uptown areas, the 20% that didn’t flood, is much like it was before the storm– at least from the street level.  

Other flooded areas are rebuilding and coming back.   The hardest hit areas still are mostly desolate patches where homes used to be.   

Financially, the effects of Katrina have been hard on everyone.   People who came back after the storm have been struggling for three years with $10,000 per year homeowner’s premiums and $5,000 per year flood premiums, an increase in property taxes in Orleans Parish, increased labor and material expenses for repairs, shady contractors who take money and never show, etc.”      

Q:  Where do you see New Orleans in the next few years, barring no more hurricanes or disasters?

“With the right leadership and funding, it’s possible to make New Orleans a great example of how to rebuild after a disaster, e.g. green projects, solar panels, etc.  It just hasn’t happened thus far.” 

Crystal works now as an attorney in New Orleans.  However, back in the 1980s, she was in the radio and television program with me at Murray State University in Kentucky.  She then went to law school in New Orleans when she moved there in the summer of 1992.

PHOTOS BY ANTHONY POSEY FROM 2005-2006

New Orleans, my thoughts go out to you and I’m glad Hurricane Isaac was only a category one storm.  I hope that’s all of the excitement you see this year and that the only hurricanes you experience are ones like these shared by Ray, Crystal, Ants, and myself in April 2010.

Anthony